The X-Files DataBase Blog

November 16, 2010

As Thanksgiving nears (and through the holidays) remember what’s actually important

Filed under: Uncategorized — xfilesdb @ 4:28 pm

Some may have noticed that this blog has sat idle since my April Fool’s Day prank of a leaked X-Files script, and there has been a good reason for that.  In January my then 15 month-old boy was rushed to the hospital with seizures.  They assumed it was an isolated incident and sent him home without medications.  Almost exactly one month later the same thing happened, rushed to the hospital with seizures.  They prescribed medication but it only held the seizures down for another month.  After an argument with the doctor where he wouldn’t change either medication or dosage he was released, only to have the seizures return a month later again.  This time I was successful in getting a medication change and then another doctor who wasn’t such a jagoff.  He has been okay since then, he has been seizure free and has also been free of the dangerous side-effects including a rash that separates the dermis from the epidermis.  Epilepsy is loosely defined as a condition where a seizure occurs without a fever or trauma to cause it.  A fever had been documented with each episode so it is still unclear whether these are febrile (fever) seizures or epilepsy.

November is epilepsy awareness month.  The color is purple.

  • Epilepsy and seizures affect almost
    3 million Americans of all ages, at an estimated annual cost of $15.5 billion in direct and indirect costs.
  • Approximately 200,000 new cases of seizures and epilepsy occur each year.
  • Ten percent of the American population will experience a seizure in their lifetime.
  • Three percent will develop epilepsy by age 75.

A few weeks ago my dad returned from a golf trip to Florida feeling horrible.  Actually he felt horrible while he was there but he still managed to kick ass on the course.  He toughed it out for a few days then went to the doctor.  The speed with which his doctor scheduled appointments and scans and follow-ups was a sign that something was very wrong.  On October 22nd i was given the news that he has pancreatic cancer, and on October 28th we were told that surgery is not an option, radiation is not an option due to the tissue surrounding the pancreas, the only option is chemotherapy.  The typical prognosis of somebody with pancreatic cancer is 5 to 8 months.  A coworker told me he his mother died after 6, another told me his brother died after 5.  It has spread into his liver, and is pressing on a kidney.

November is Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month.

  • Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States
  • This year, it is estimated that over 43,000 people will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in the United States, and 36,000 will die from the disease.
  • Pancreatic cancer is one of the few cancers for which the survival rate has not improved substantially over nearly 40 years.
  • Pancreatic cancer has the highest mortality rate of all major cancers.  Only 6% of pancreatic cancer patients will survive more than five years.
  • There are no detection tools to diagnose the disease in its early stages.
  • Pancreatic cancer is significantly under-funded.  The National Cancer Institute spends just 2% of their cancer research budget on pancreatic cancer research.

i already had perspective on what’s important before any of this stuff started.  My son will likely be just fine.  My dad won’t.  Patrick Swayze lived for 20 months with pancreatic cancer, and Randy Pausch lived almost 2 years. If you do happen to be one of the lucky ones who don’t get trampled on Black Friday and get a great deal, consider donating the money you saved to a worthy cause. Or volunteer somewhere, at a food pantry or a soup kitchen. Be thankful for the little things. i’m thankful for Fringe and The Event.

Hope all my fellow X-Philers have a great Thanksgiving,
i

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